What is a vocation, and how do I know that I am called? Please look at the pages below to get a better understanding about the Dominican Vocation: 

A day in the life of the Dominican Studium

When talking about the vocation to religious life, and specifically the Dominican way of Religious Life, one of the recurring questions is what a day in the life of a Dominican Brother is like. So we took a camera into our Studium in Dublin to give a taste of what the day in the life of a student brother of the Dominican Order typically looks like.

Naturally the daily routine for the brothers who have completed their studies is slightly different as they go about their own ministries. But the general structure, where communal prayers form the hinges of the day, would be what constitutes the fundamental aspect of a day as a Dominican brother.

Our Studium, the place where we do our theological formation, is located in St. Saviour’s Priory, Dublin 1, Ireland.

If you would like to know more about the vocation as a Dominican, contact the Vocation Director on vocations@dominicans.ie.

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Vocations Icon

Last month the Vocations Icon, an Icon of St. Dominic, started a new tour of the Irish Province in Newbridge College in Newbridge to encourage prayer for vocations the Dominican Order, and specifically the Irish Province. The Icon moved to St. Malachy’s in Dundalk last weekend, the 21st and 22nd and of October. The icon will remain in Dundalk for about four weeks before it will continue its journey to the next priory.

Please keep supporting us and pray for vocations.


Lord Jesus,
as once you called Saint Dominic to preach the Gospel,
so now, through the intercession of Our Blessed Lady, Queen of the Most Holy Rosary, and patroness of the Order,
we ask you to send new preachers into your harvest.

Give them the graces necessary to preach with wisdom and courage.
May they be witnesses to your life, death and resurrection, bringing the light of the true faith into the darkness of people’s lives.
You who live and reign for ever and ever.

Amen


 

Video of the Priestly Ordination of Fr. Philip Mulryne OP

This is a short video about the ordination to the priesthood of Father Philip Mulryne OP by His Grace Archbishop Joseph Augustine Di Noia OP during the 11.00am celebration of Mass in Saint Saviour’s Church, Dominican Street, on the 8th of July 2017.  Archbishop Augustine Di Noia is Assistant Secretary at the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith and he travelled from Rome for today’s special ceremony. Fr. Philip OP is ordained a priest for the Dominican Order (Order of Preachers).

Philip Mulryne was born in Belfast, and whilst playing for his parish soccer team: Saint Oliver Plunkett, Philip was spotted by a scout for Manchester United Football Club and invited as a 14 year old to go to Manchester for a trial.  Philip impressed and then signed a schoolboy contract for 2 years.  In 1994 Philip finished secondary school and went to Manchester United full time as a professional on a four-year contract.  Making his debut in 1997 against Ipswich Town Football Club, Philip played five times in total for the first team before being transferred to Norwich City Football Club in 1999, playing 135 times for Norwich City during a period of six years.  Philip made his debut for the Northern Ireland Football Team in 1997 against Belgium and went on to play 27 times for Northern Ireland, scoring three goals.

After short spells at Cardiff City and Leyton Orient, Philip retired officially from football in 2009 and entered the Diocesan Seminary of Saint Malachy’s Belfast, spending two years studying philosophy at Queens University Belfast and at the Maryvale Institute.  Philip completed his studies in philosophy and went to the Pontifical Irish College, Rome, to study theology for one year at the Gregorian University before discerning a call to religious life.  Philip entered the Dominican Novitiate House in Cork in 2012.

Please keep Fr. Philip OP in your prayers as he starts the next step of his life as a Dominican in his priestly vocation!

Some photo’s of the event and a shorter video can be found here.

The video is free to be used for publication once the Irish Province of the Dominican Order and this website www.dominicans.ie are credited. The original video file can be downloaded here.

Ordination to the Priesthood of Fr. Philip Mulryne OP

Today in Dublin Reverend Brother Philip Mulryne OP was ordained a priest for the Dominican Order (Order of Preachers) by His Grace Archbishop Joseph Augustine Di Noia OP during the 11.00am celebration of Mass in Saint Saviour’s Church, Dominican Street.  Archbishop Augustine Di Noia is Assistant Secretary at the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith and he travelled from Rome for today’s special ceremony.

Philip Mulryne was born in Belfast and whilst playing for his parish soccer team: Saint Oliver Plunkett, Philip was spotted by a scout for Manchester United Football Club and invited as a 14 year old to go to Manchester for a trial.  Philip impressed and then signed a schoolboy contract for 2 years.  In 1994 Philip finished secondary school and went to Manchester United full time as a professional on a four-year contract.  Making his debut in 1997 against Ipswich Town Football Club, Philip played five times in total for the first team before being transferred to Norwich City Football Club in 1999, playing 135 times for Norwich City during a period of six years.  Philip made his debut for the Northern Ireland Football Team in 1997 against Belgium and went on to play 27 times for Northern Ireland, scoring three goals.

After short spells at Cardiff City and Leyton Orient, Philip retired officially from football in 2009 and entered the Diocesan Seminary of Saint Malachy’s Belfast, spending two years studying philosophy at Queens University Belfast and at the Maryvale Institute.  Philip completed his studies in philosophy and went to the Pontifical Irish College, Rome, to study theology for one year at the Gregorian University before discerning a call to religious life.  Philip entered the Dominican Novitiate House in Cork in 2012.

We rejoice with Fr. Philip and his family on this beautiful day. Please keep Fr. Philip OP in your prayers as he starts the next step of his life as a Dominican in his priestly vocation!

Please see blow some pictures of the events, and a short video. A more extended video can be viewed here.

The photos and the video are free to be used for publication once the Irish Province of the Dominican Order and this website www.dominicans.ie are credited. The full size of the uploaded pictures can be downloaded when clicking on the picture and using the link at the right bottom. The video file can be downloaded here.

Renewal of Simple Professions

While bro. Philip Mulryan O.P. made his Solemn Profession during the 11 am Mass on Sunday the 11th of September, bros Matthew Farrell O.P. and Jesse Maingot O.P. renewed their Simple Profession during morning prayer in St. Saviour’s Dublin.

Ordinarily brothers take three years of Simple Profession after they finish their noviciate and renew it then for one year before making their Solemn Profession. We congratulate Matthew and Jesse and pray for a fruitful year of studies before they make their Solemn Profession next year.

Later this week, on Wednesday the 14th, five men are to receive the Dominican Habit in St. Mary’s Pope’s Quay during the 11 am Mass and start their noviciate. The next day, the four current novices finishing their noviciate with their First Profession also in St. Mary’s, Pope’s Quay in Cork, during the 11 am Mass.

Please keep them in your prayers as they prepare for their own commitment and continuation of their journey into the Dominican way of life.

Solemn Profession bro. Philip Mulryne OP

The Irish Province celebrates the Solemn Profession of Br. Philip Mulryne OP. Solemn profession is  the final step in becoming fully a Dominican. The vow of obedience is made until death, unlike the vow of simple profession which is made for a specific period of time.

Br. Philip will continue his studies leading to his ordination to the diaconate and eventually, with the help of God and his brothers, to his ordination as a priest. Please pray for Br. Philip and Brs Jesse and Matthew who renewed their simple vows today.

Visit to Siena Monastery

On Monday last, the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord, and World Day for Consecrated Life, we paid a visit to our sisters in Siena Monastery, Drogheda. They are contemplative Dominican nuns, following St Dominic above all in their sustained openness to the Word of God, in Scripture and the Eucharist. Their main work is Eucharistic adoration and the praying of the Divine Office, and their prayer is the engine that keeps their brothers going!

It’s always a joy to be with our sisters – they are an example to us of the priority of prayer in the Dominican way of life. We Dominicans are called to be preachers, but we can only preach Christ if we come to know him intimately in prayer. And because the Dominican nuns are so radically focussed on the Lord, their wordless preaching is more powerful than any homily.

The sisters are playing a big part in the fascinating new project, ‘The Rise of the Roses’. This is a project led by Catholic lay women (married and single), who want to shine a light on female religious life, to show the beauty of a life promised to God. There’ll be a summer tour as part of this project, visiting ten convents and monasteries around Ireland. The Dominican nuns in Drogheda will be acting as hosts on 4 July. Have a look at their website for more information – and if you’re a woman, why not come along and find out more about these daughters of St Dominic?

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Celebrating the Year of Consecrated Life

The Year of Consecrated Life begins today, November 30. As a way of marking this year, some dedicated Irish laypeople have produced a beautiful video which features the testimonies of five religious, and includes shots of our life here in St Saviour’s. It’s a great way to remind people that consecrated life is not a private commitment on the part of some religious, but is something for the whole Church. All of us benefit from consecrated life, and all of us should do what we can to promote it. You could start by watching this video and sharing it with your friends!

Priestly Ordinations July 2014

The Irish Dominican friars rejoiced as two of their brothers were ordained to the priesthood in Saint Saviour’s Dominican church, Dominick Street in Dublin. The ordaining prelate was Archbishop of Dublin, Diarmuid Martin.

Our brothers were joined by many friars of the province, families and friends to witness the joyful liturgy of ordination. The two brothers Colm Mannion OP, Luuk Jansen OP joined the Order together in 2007 with and Matthew Martinez OP, who will be ordained priest in Trinidad on the 2nd of August. See some pictures of the ordination below:

 

He was crushed for our iniquities

crossA Reading from the Prophet Isaiah:

A man of sorrows and acquainted with grief; One from whom men hide their face
He was despised, and we did not esteem Him. Yet ours were the grief He bore, our sorrows He carried; He was crushed for our iniquities; All of us like sheep have gone astray; But The Righteous One My Servant will justify the many and bear their iniquities.

 

Some of the most dramatic images we have of Mother Teresa reveal a saint who reached out to those truly on society’s fringes in Calcutta – the suffering and destitute. Here was a woman who brought Christ’s love and mercy into the lives of those the world seemed to abandon, transforming lives marred by fear and anguish through disease and extreme poverty.

In seeking to understand the awesome and life-giving reality that is Good Friday – this group of people I have been describing are a very good place to start. For no distant God of ideas or mere rules could speak meaningfully of life, hope and love to those who suffer. Only a God who himself tasted the bitter word and stigma of public shame and rejection could hope to touch the minds and hearts of those who have themsevles suffered so. This is where we begin to glimpse the essence of what Good Friday is – A day when Christ himself entered into the extremes of suffering and death. A day, when God assured us that His love and mercy knows no limits, no boundaries, but rather, seeks to reach out and save a suffering humanity even amidst the very depths of pain or sin.

The great Swiss theologian Von Balthasar wonderfully saw in the Cross, an act of love so great, it is beyond anything humanity could ever have imagined. This was the work of a God who – out of love – had already sent his only Son, at the Incarnation, all the way into the depths of our humanity. Jesus’s own earthly life speaks to us of a divine love which sought always to reach out into the depths of human existence, most especially towards those on the fringes. For Jesus searched out the God-forsaken.

A Friend of Tax-collectors and sinners, Jesus’ response to the pride and righteousness of the Pharisees in Luke’s Gospel, gives us a vivid insight into His mission of love and redemption – for he tells us that he comes “for those in need of a physician – sinners in need of repentance.” The lost, the sick, the suffering – it is such people that Jesus found, healed and restored.

So why did Jesus, God-made-man, seek out the fringes, and those in the extremes of sin and suffering? Our lives show us that both sin and suffering are inevitable human realities – for the atheist as much as for the saint. We can surely recognise the meaningfulness of a suffering God for those who themselves physically suffer. In reality, however, it is sin which makes us suffer most – it is sin alone which possesses the power to push any of us to the true fringes of existence.

For in wilfully turning away from our true good – that is, following Christ and His example, we ourselves bear a stigma that burdens the heart and mind. It is sin which darkens our own horizons, diminishing us far more than any poverty or physical disease ever could. Our goal, our earthly journey towards Truth, Goodness, Beauty and love itself, is blocked and ends in death, only through sin. The great mystery of God’s redemption, however, is that, it is the utter tragedy of such sin, man’s felix culpa, which drew down, our divine physician.

This is what brings us back to that First Good-Friday. For on that day, we saw most clearly, upon the Cross, and in that passion evoked so eloquently by the Prophet Isaiah, the unimaginable depths that God’s love will descend to in order to reach the sinner. In the extremities of evil, sin and death which Christ embraced and conquered on that day, we truly witness the value even the lowliest sinner possesses in God’s eyes. For it is the immensity of God’s love, mercy and forgiveness for each and every one of us, that drew Christ to the Cross that fateful day.

The most awesome reality this Good Friday, and indeed every day, is that such love and forgiveness -the full power of Christ Himself is still flowing, through that Church He instigated. The forgiveness and promise of paradise, offered to the repentant thief, in those final moments upon the Cross, is ours now- active with no less force- in the boundless mercy of Confession.

That divine Body – love, truth and goodness itself – given freely upon the Cross, is still offered each day for us- upon the Eucharistic altar. So we see that passion, that divine love displayed so vividly on that First Good Friday endures for each of us to this day. That is why Good Friday remains forever so, very, very Good.